What is a building that is true and lovable? The quest for beauty and truth to reveal the glory and love of God is at the heart of the new Carmelite monastery being built in Fairfield, Pennsylvania.
Bishop Ronald Gainer of the Diocese Of Harrisburg is witnessing a boom of vocations in his diocese amongst very young men and women who are inspired by the Latin Mass, and eager to devote themselves to a life of prayer, liturgy and penance, interceding for the Church and the world.
What is happening in Fairfield, PA is special in so many ways. The building of the new monastery, guided by the spirit of the Carmelite Mothers, has produced a unique Christian community of volunteers and master craftsmen, many of whom live, work and, in the fine Catholic tradition, feast together!

The inspiring story of the rapid rise in vocations amongst young Carmelite women in America is no longer a best kept secret and the Carmel of Jesus, Mary and Joseph is a shining example. It would not be happening without the heroic faith and support of women like Mary Bauer, mother of 6, one of whom is a Carmelite Nun herself.

On June 27th, with the completion of the first stone building at the new monastery site, the Mother Prioress, Subprioress, and stone craftsman, Neil Rippingale, place a letter in a time capsule, addressing the future generations of nuns and the faithful.
The construction of the new Carmelite monastery in Fairfield, Pennsylvania has attracted the attention of some of the world's finest stone masons and builders, including Texas custom home builder Tom Deibel, who is sharing his expertise and a big piece of his heart.
 
When the Mothers of the Carmel Of Jesus, Mary and Joseph began planning the building of an authentic stone and timber style monastery in Fairfield, Pennsylvania, they reached out to one of the world's most sought after Dry Stone Masons.

On the day of her entrance, Sr. Emma Rivas shares her reasons why she chose the Carmel of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph. Mechanical Engineer Michael Bauer explains the building and design process; and Bishop Ronald Gainer expresses his support for this endeavor.

Using old-world methods and durable stone and wood craftsmanship, the Carmel of JMJ Fairfield is building a new monastery.

Photos of the building process and progress.